Notes from our Eastern Greenland Photography Adventure / Aug 2016

All images made with the Fujifilm X-T2 and Fujinon lenses. Images and text are @Jack Graham and Jack Graham Photography LLC

NEXT GREENLAND PHOTO WORKSHOP is SEPTEMBER 3-8 2018

CLICK HERE FOR INFO

___________________________________________________________________

_DSF9582-Edit

Why go to Greenland? If you really want to feel like you are removed from the craziness of the rest of the world, this is the place for you. For us photographers, it’s a paradise.

I took a group of photographers with me. They were all real troopers. They were really great and accepted Greenland for what it is. We all had to deal with getting in and out of boats on rocks or piers that require climbing, non-western facilities, some strange food and smaller than usual sleeping accommodations. We all felt that we lived like the locals do, which is pretty cool.

_DSF0087

There are two areas of Greenland, the western area and the eastern area. The population is far lower in the east where it’s a bit harder to live. Due to weather and the topography.  Here are a few facts about Eastern Greenland:

  • Greenland is the world’s largest island
  • 85% of Greenland is covered in ice
  • Thought geographically, Greenland is part of North America but it’s a part of Denmark and feels like you are in Europe.
  • Out of a total population of around 56,000 for the entire country, about 3,000 or so live in the Ammassalik area of Eastern Greenland. The largest town is Tasiilaq, population around 2,100.
  • There are no roads. You get around by foot or by boat.
  • You can fly into Kulusuk from Iceland (fares are not cheap) then go by boat to small towns in the area.
  • The population is mostly Inuit that migrated from the north in the 14th and 15th century.
  • _DSF9576Dogs are everywhere. These are sled dogs, not the kind of pets we know in the US. They are working dogs and provide transportation through the heavy snow in the winter.

IMG_0727

 

We flew from Reykjavik to Kulusuk but at the very last-minute the pilot aborted the landing due to fog and rain. The runway in Kulusuk is dirt, not pavement. After a day back in Reykjavik we finally made it back to Kulusuk then immediately got into our two boats and headed for a small town about 2-3 hrs. away called Tinit.

 

 

 

_DSF9515-Edit-Edit

_DSF0071-Edit-EditPeople live in small colorful houses in eastern Greenland. The Danish government assigns house color by occupation. Red are government workers, school teachers, administrators etc. Blue are for a type of engineer, Green are for another type of engineer and yellow are for health care providers (doctors and nurses). The indigenous Greenlanders feed their families and dogs by hunting whales, fish and seals. There is a grocery store in each village. Food is imported from Denmark from April through October. Weather prevents boats from landing in the winter. Food can be pretty scarce later in the winter. The Inuits do not waste anything. Yes the food we were presented with was traditional. We actually stayed in the blue house on the left (above image)—What a view!

_DSF0073-Edit-2-Edit

The following morning provided us with a remarkable sunrise. After breakfast we headed out by boat up the fjord to capture the magnificent icebergs. We were quite surprised to be able to see and photograph the humpback whales surfacing, then diving right in front of us.

_DSF9840-Edit-Edit-Edit-Edit

After one final night in Tinit, we headed out again by boat to photograph and explore the fjord on the way to the town of Tasiilaq. We were able to land the boat on the rocks and hop off and photograph a beautiful glacier and the fjord. This was one of the most beautiful glaciers I’ve ever seen.

_DSF0464-Edit

_DSF0139-Pano-Edit

_DSF0433-Edit-2

Click HERE for a short video of us sailing through the ice on the way to the glacier

We made it to Tasiilaq and were rewarded with a decent aurora at night by August standards. On our last night we sailed out to the largest icebergs I’ve ever seen. I am guessing this was about 20-30 stories tall! The late light was amazing and just kept getting better and better.

 

We finished our journey with one last night in Kulusuk before flying back to Reykjavik.

 

Below are some images from our trip. Enjoy them… I sure did making them….Jack

_DSF0566-Edit-Edit-Edit_DSF9965-Edit-Edit_DSF9942-Edit

_DSF9487-Edit

_DSF0319-Edit_DSF0250-Edit-Edit

_DSF0547

 

Mt Rainier with the FUJIFILM X-T2

I am up on Mt Rainier this weekend conducting a photo workshop. Daytime light has been somewhat challenging, but the first light of the morning has been amazing.  It’s the peak of the spring wildflower bloom here and at about 5500-5600′ the flowers are quite good. and have been providing some descent foregrounds.

Below are some images captured with the FUJIFILM X-T2. I’ve been using both  the 16-55 mm F2.8 as well as the 50-140

The X-T2 continues to impress.  I have no doubt this camera is going to give the big boys some healthy competition–JG

_DSF9323-Edit-Edit

_DSF9305-Edit

_DSF9319-2_DSF9316-Edit

CAMERA BRANDS —Choosing a Photo Workshop !

Using ExifTool technology, an analysis of camera brands, lenses and how folks photograph ( data including most often used ISO settings, exposure etc) has been compiled. This information is based on about 6.7  million images from sites like Flicker, 500PX and more.

HERE are their findings. I bet you’ll find this interesting. Click on the camera brand on the tab ebelow the pie graph to see lens and camera data by each manufacturer.

Canon & Nikon are about 71% of the pie with Canon leading the way by about 5% over Nikon..

__________________________________________________________

CHOOSING A PHOTO WORKSHOP—–ITS A JUNGLE OUT THERE!

_EYE1155 jack giving direction_1A few years ago ( some thing really don’t change) I wrote an extensive article here on my blog regarding Photo Workshops and how to choose the right one for you. This discussion came up on the phone with a friend yesterday so I am going to re post it here. CHICK HERE to read it. I know it will help those of you looking for the the right workshop!

_________________________________________________________________

Below are more FUJIFILM X-T2 IMAGES taken on the Oregon Coast

all images                        ©Jack Graham, All Rights reserved

Monochrome images taken using the Acros Film setting in-camera

_DSF1989

_DSF1968-Edit-Edit

_DSF1996

_DSF1982-Edit_DSF1971-Edit-Edit-Edit

_DSF2022

 

Back from the Oregon Coast/ FUJIFILM EVENT in SEATTLE THIS WEEK….

Rather than duplicate what I published on our FUJI “X”Photography Workshops Site, HERE is the link where you can read about it. I continue to be amazed by the performance of the X-T2 by FUJIFILM. There are many new images on the other site.

_DSF0373I am really getting spoiled. I have had 3 really great groups in a row ( Palouse , Whidbey Island and now the Southern Oregon Coast) Their images were outstanding and they all bought into my philosophy of slowing down, simplifying and enjoying the experience… in other words, becoming artist instead of camera owners!

It will be great to be with my great friends from FUJIFILM later this week here in Seattle as well as my com padre, Bill Fortney who;s also coming out for the event. Please give THIS LINK a read and come join us on Friday afternoon if you are in the Seattle area.

Below are some images from the the X-T2 previously unpublished-  notice the detail!-JG

_DSF0324

_DSF0151

_DSF0144

_DSF0310

_DSF0178-Edit-Edit_DSF0374

_DSF0074

 

 

IMAGES FROM THE FUJI X-T2

I  received quite a bit of reaction to my blog post yesterday concerning the X-T2.  Last night I attended the VIP event in NYC for the formal “unveiling” of the camera. It was a great party and it was great to see my good friends at FUJIFILM  as well as other folks I know and respect in our industry

It sure was fun getting to shoot this camera for a few months before its formal announcement last night.I would like to thank my friends at FUJIFILM for the opportunity. I hope in some small way those of us who go to test the X-T2 and send along results to Fuji made a difference.

I got a lot of comments and requests to post more images I made using the X-T2.. I really tried to put the X-T2 through its paces.  While in the Palouse region of Eastern Washing I photographer a crop duster flying over an adjacent field.. Along with the X-T2 I used the Fujinon 100-400mm with and without the 2X converter. The image below is  Meta Data

016:06:09 06:51:36…..100-400mm @ 400mm    600mm (in 35mm film)

1/8000 sec, f8    ISO: 2000

WHAT WAS AMAZING TO ME WAS :in Wide Tracking the camera completely locked in and auto-focused perfectly at F8 !!!! impressive.

_DSF1252

Anyhow below are some images showing the detail and ability to render what is to me a visible improvement over the X-T1, which is a very decent  camera.  All Monochrome images were made using the new ACROS film simulation setting…..Enjoy!!!-JG

_DSF0709-Edit

_DSF0593_DSF0432_DSF1118

 

_DSF1427-Edit-Edit

_DSF1375

_DSF0935-Edit_DSF0608

 

 

FUJIFILM X-T2 / FIRST IMPRESSIONS

img_main01

FOLKS,

I just published my article “FIRST IMPRESSIONS / FUJIFILM X-T2 on our website dedicated to Fuji “X”Photo Workshops ( which I conduct with my dear friend Bill Fortney).

CLICK HERE to read it……. I low this camera—YOU WILL TOO! —-Jack

3 days on Whidbey Island…

I returned home yesterday form a 3 day workshop that I conduct for the Pacific Northwest Art School on Whidbey Island. Whidbey Island is a sort 20 minute ferry ride either from Port Townsend or Mukilteo north of Seattle by about 1/2 hr. Once you get on the Island it’s like being in a different world. Thing are very pastoral and  a bit slower than the busy big city. The locals kind of pride themselves on that.

_DSF1802-Edit

 

As in all my other workshops I not only stress the obvious things we all need to know about photography but I try to get my attendees to slow down, enjoy the experience and begin to learn to see images even before taking the camera out of the bag. This group really “got it”.

I have had few groups that produced the quality of work this one did. We had some great light to photograph the amazing lavender found at the Lavender Wind Farm as well as elsewhere on the Island.

I have more workshops scheduled in 2016 and five coming in 2017. Whidbey Island is a special place!–JG

 

 

_DSF1827-Edit-Edit  _DSF1842-Edit-Edit

_DSF1846

_DSF1786-Edit

_DSF1656-Edit-Edit-Edit

… a blog about everything photography

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 5,501 other followers

%d bloggers like this: